Female Frontiers: Engineering

N’Shama Sterling (‘60) N’Shama Sterling, née Rosemary Och, wanted to attend Villanova to study electrical engineering. But in the late 1950s, Villanova – along with many other universities – only accepted women in certain programs. Gonzaga University, however, was open to women interested in any major, engineering included. “I checked out a catalog from the […]

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Female Frontiers: Business

Noreen Littman (‘62) Majoring in business was a gamble “I remember searching for a major, thinking I should do psychology or journalism,” Noreen Littman said. “I was complaining to my guy friends that I couldn’t find a major and they said, ‘Why don’t you try a business major? No other girl has come through that […]

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Female Frontiers: Theology

Sister Mary Henriette Hoene Breaking the Stained-glass ceiling “My provincial was a very forward-looking lady,” said Sister Mary Henriette Hoene. “She knew it was in my best interest – and in the best interest of the School of the Sisters of Notre Dame, really – for me to earn a degree in theology.” One of […]

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Female Frontiers

By Sabrina Jones The aftermath of World War II led to a new era at Gonzaga. In 1948, the University first accepted coed undergraduates. They lived with families in Spokane and eventually on campus in the original Crimont Hall. The Young women thrived, Learned and were shaped in Gonzaga’s Jesuit, Catholic tradition. Here, we tell […]

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Higher education and a tower of hope

Burmese refugee students work in the computer lab set up in their camp by Jesuit Commons. This group graduated in August with a diploma from Australian Catholic University. Gonzaga, Regis, St. Louis and Fairfield universities each contributed one course to the eight-course program. Mark Beattie designed the Gonzaga course on leadership theory and co-taught it with Tom McFarland, who is retired from Gonzaga.

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Sabbaticals yield a rich harvest from A, for autism, to W, for Word 2007 math add-on

Sabbaticals are traditionally a time to explore, discover and learn. A time to deepen or broaden one’s scholarship. Three Gonzaga professors describe their experiences from the 2009-10 year: Professor Randy Williams, who teaches special education, took a year’s sabbatical to complete writing and editing his new book, “Effective Programs for Treating Autism Spectrum Disorder:  Applied Behavior Analysis […]

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Working in Clay, A Slideshow

[slidepress gallery=’gieber-pottery-slideshow-3′] Professor Terry Gieber has not only taught ceramics at Gonzaga for nearly a quarter century. He has done integral restoration tile projects across the country. He has also worked for the past five years with Engineers without Borders and Potters for Peace on the production of ceramic water filters in Porto Novo, Benin, […]

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Costuming Romeo and Juliet

A sea of details, an ocean of silk: Costuming ‘Romeo and Juliet’ “Romeo and Juliet” is all about the drama. But behind the tragic love scenes and fighting sequences are the delicate details of hand-crafted corsets and metal-hooped farthingales. With any play, it is the details that make or break the production, and at Gonzaga […]

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